Teaching Yoga at Sutter Center for Psychiatry through the Yoga Seed Collective

I am lucky enough to be one of the teachers in on the ground floor of a project that provides #yoga to the patients at Sutter Center for Psychiatry.  It has been an enormous challenge and a third eye-opening experience.  The #YogaSeedCollective, the non-profit that organizes the outreach effort, is a quietly powerful force in the community, offering classes at the local prisons, drug rehabilitation centers and now at Sutter.  Getting involved with this community of hardworking, no-nonsense yogis is one of the best things that has happened to me since arriving in #Sacramento.  I feel inexpressible gratitude to them, on my own behalf and on behalf of all the people they serve.  

I wrote a short piece about my experience at Sutter, you can read it here in the Yoga Seed’s Outreach update:

http://www.theyogaseed.org/outreach-article1/?utm_source=Copy+of+Newsletter+for+9%2F10&utm_campaign=Constant+Contact+Newsletter&utm_medium=email

Also, I want to say, of my own volition, how impressed I am with Sutter’s facility.  The dedication and level of understanding I see every day with the staff is awe inspiring.  I recently lost someone in my life to suicide, and while that person was not part of this community, I wonder if his situation would have changed had he access to care like Sutter provides.  If you or someone you know is suffering from mental illness, I would strongly urge you to seek help and based on my limited experience, I would not hesitate to recommend SCP.  (I have not been paid or am in any way affiliated with Sutter; I am an independent contractor through the Yoga Seed.)

To visit Sutter’s website, vist: http://www.suttermedicalcenter.org/psychiatry

#mentalhealth #mentalillness #psychiatry

 

 

Some Unbridled Sharing about the Yoga Seed, Sacramento

I recently started teaching an outreach class through Yoga Seed Collective a non-profit studio on the 1400 Block of E street in Midtown Sacramento.  I teach at-risk teens one day a week at a charter school called Heritage Peaks in Oak Park.  The Yoga Seed handled all the paperwork, got me in there teaching immediately and got me paid.

The first time I walked into the studio, I knew there was something unique about this place.   The room is large with exposed beams, it feels old and solid, very peaceful.  I attended a class called All Bodies, and it is exactly that.  There were people recovering from injuries, obese people, young, old, all colors, shapes and sizes.  The class was slow and methodical, but rigorous at the same time.  It was also what you might call an open dialogue class, where people were free to ask questions or make observations.  I loved it when ML, the teacher said something to the effect of  “we are not trying to wrap our leg around our head, we are trying to prevent slipping in the shower.”

The thing is, most yoga studios are trying to turn a profit.  So while they employ the gentlest form of capitalism, there is still a tension there between wanting to offer the community a service and making money.  We all wish we could rise above the system but we all have to pay the rent.

The difference with Yoga Seed is that the money comes from donors, big or small, so whoever wants to practice, can.  It’s kind of like, dare I say it, socialized healthcare, where those who can pay in, do, and those who can’t still get care.

The team of people who work there are not just good teachers, they are advocates.  Yoga is the platform for a larger social awareness.  They teach in the prison, at rehab centers, they even offer a class to the employees at the Department of Education.

I’m impressed by this approach because it loosens the financial grip that prohibits a lot of people from practicing. I’m also thrilled to be a part of the goal, in my small way.

theyogaseed.org